Is Crypto a Pyramid Scheme?

In this blog post, we’ll explore the question of whether or not crypto is a pyramid scheme. We’ll look at the definition of a pyramid scheme and how crypto fits (or doesn’t fit) into that definition.

Checkout this video:

What is a pyramid scheme?

A pyramid scheme is an illegal Investment scheme where new investors are recruited to make payments to earlier investors. The scheme relies on a constant flow of new investment to keep it going. Pyramid schemes are also sometimes called Ponzi schemes.

The difference between a pyramid scheme and a legitimate MLM

In the simplest terms, a pyramid scheme is a business model that relies on recruiting new members to generate income for the people at the top of the pyramid. These schemes often promise high returns for those who invest, but they are actually impossible to sustain, and most people who get involved end up losing money.

In contrast, a legitimate MLM is a legal way to run a business that can generate income for both the company and its members. In an MLM, new members join not to make money for those at the top, but to sell products or services and earn commissions on their sales. This type of structure is sustainable and can be profitable for both the company and its members.

What is cryptocurrency?

Cryptocurrency is a digital asset designed to work as a medium of exchange that uses cryptography to secure its transactions, to control the creation of additional units, and to verify the transfer of assets. Cryptocurrency is a type of electronic cash. It is decentralized, meaning it is not subject to government or financial institution control. Bitcoin, the first and most well-known cryptocurrency, was created in 2009.

Bitcoin

Cryptocurrency is a digital or virtual currency that uses cryptography for security. A cryptocurrency is difficult to counterfeit because of this security feature. A defining feature of a cryptocurrency, and arguably its most endearing allure, is its organic nature; it is not issued by any central authority, rendering it theoretically immune to government interference or manipulation.

Bitcoin, the first and most well-known cryptocurrency, was created in 2009. Since then, numerous other cryptocurrencies have been created. These are frequently called altcoins, as a blending of bitcoin alternative. Most altcoins are less than five years old. Bitcoin and its derivatives use decentralized control as opposed to centralized electronic money/centralized banking systems. The decentralized control of each cryptocurrency works through distributed ledger technology, typically a blockchain, that serves as a public financial transaction database.

Ethereum

Ethereum is a decentralized platform that runs smart contracts: applications that run exactly as programmed without any possibility of fraud or third party interference.

Ethereum is a public blockchain-based distributed computing platform, featuring smart contract (scripting) functionality. It provides a decentralized virtual machine, the Ethereum Virtual Machine (EVM), which can execute scripts using an international network of public nodes. Ethereum also provides a cryptocurrency token called “ether”, which can be transferred between accounts and used to compensate participant nodes for computations performed. “Gas”, an internal transaction pricing mechanism, is used to mitigate spam and allocate resources on the network.

Ethereum was proposed in late 2013 by Vitalik Buterin, a cryptocurrency researcher and programmer. Development was funded by an online crowdsale that took place between July and August 2014.[10] The system went live on 30 July 2015, with 72 million coins “premined”. This accounts for about 99% of the total circulating supply in 2019. In 2016, as a result of the collapse of The DAO project, Ethereum was split into two separate blockchains – the new separate version became Ethereum (ETH), and the original continued as Ethereum Classic (ETC). The value of the Ethereum currency grew over 13,000 percent in 2017.

Litecoin

Litecoin is a cryptocurrency that was created in 2011 by Charlie Lee. Litecoin is similar to Bitcoin but has faster transaction times and a different mining algorithm.

Cryptocurrencies are digital or virtual tokens that use cryptography to secure their transactions and to control the creation of new units. Cryptocurrencies are decentralized, which means they are not subject to government or financial institution control.

Bitcoin, the first and most well-known cryptocurrency, was created in 2009. Cryptocurrencies are often traded on decentralized exchanges and can also be used to purchase goods and services.

Is cryptocurrency a pyramid scheme?

Cryptocurrency, also known as virtual currency or digital currency, is a type of money that is not tangible. It is a digital asset that uses cryptography to secure its transactions and to control the creation of new units. Cryptocurrency is decentralized, which means it is not subject to government or financial institution control. Bitcoin, the first and most well-known cryptocurrency, was created in 2009.

The difference between a pyramid scheme and a legitimate ICO

When people talk about a cryptocurrency pyramid scheme, they are usually referring to an ICO, or initial coin offering, that turns out to be a scam. This can happen in a number of ways, but the most common is when the project fails to deliver on its promises, or when the team behind the ICO disappears with the money.

A legitimate ICO will have a clear roadmap of what they are trying to achieve and how they plan to use the funds raised. They will also have a team of experienced developers who are committed to delivering the project. If you are thinking about investing in an ICO, make sure you do your due diligence first.

A pyramid scheme, on the other hand, is an illegal way of raising money through recruiting new members into the scheme. The money made by each new member is used to pay those who recruited them, and so on up the pyramid. Eventually, there are no new members and the scheme collapses.

Conclusion

After doing extensive research, we have come to the conclusion that crypto is not a pyramid scheme. While there are some individual operators within the space who may be engaging in fraudulent activity, the vast majority of projects and companies appear to be legitimate. Furthermore, the overall ecosystem appears to be growing and maturing, with increasing numbers of users, developers, and businesses involved.

Scroll to Top